K's



Capt. John Kent was among the very early settlers in Remsen, coming from Southwick, Mass. His wife, Grace, born
   in Southwick July 31, 1751, was a daughter of John & Anna Loomis Root. Mr. Kent was a soldier in the Revolution
   having enlisted three times; the last time to serve three years, but the war closed before the expiration of the time of his
   enlistment. Broughton W. Green is authority for the statement that the first marriage in Remsen was that of a daughter
   of Mr. Kent; and also that he kept the first hotel in the township. He died here in 1795 or 96.
   A Narrative History of Remsen New York including parts of adjoining townships of Steuben and Trenton 1789-1898,
   by Millard F. Roberts, pub. 1914
   Kathy Last


Silas Kent Sr., born in Southwick, Mass. February 5, 1778, came to Remsen before 1800 and was married here
   March 25, 1801. His wife, Annis, was also a native of Connecticut, born in New Milford, October 1, 1782. He died
   here February 17, 1813, aged thirty-five years, and his widow survived him until June 17, 1864, dying at the age of
   eighty-one years. Their children were Chester, born January 1, 1802; Grace G., born March 1, 1803, married
   Norman Brainard, removed to Oakland county, Mich.; John, born November 7, 1804, removed to Chautauqua
   county, NY, died April 13, 1873; Sylvina, born July 27, 1806, married Eleazer Green and removed to Harmony, NY;
   Silas Jr. born July 7, 1808, a successful farmer, died August 27, 1896; and Annis (Mrs. Sage), born May 6, 1812,
   removed to Fauquier county, Va.
   A Narrative History of Remsen New York including parts of adjoining townships of Steuben and Trenton 1789-1898,
   by Millard F. Roberts, pub. 1914
   Kathy Last


Rev. Samuel Kirkland
In 1766, Rev. Samuel Kirkland, a native of Connecticut, and a graduate of Princeton college, New Jersey, settled among the Oneidas, as a missionary. Through his influence they were restrained from engaging on the side of the British during the war of the revolution.
Mr. Kirkland remained among the Indians during the war, was interpreter to the American officers who visited the, and officiated as chaplain to the army during Sullivan's campaign. After the revolution he settled again in Oneida county, and the legislature of the state granted him the township of Kirkland, as an acknowledgement of his valuable services to the state of his adoption..
From "Geography of the State of New York" published by J. H. Mather & Co. at Hartford in 1847. Pages 280-281.
Sheila Hoffman